Government on the Web http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=tag/Big%20Data en Modeling the Rise in Internet-based Petitions http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/83 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-type"> <div class="field-label">Type:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Article </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication-cat"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Collective Action </div> <div class="field-item even"> Big Data </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-publication-date"> <div class="field-label">Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Aug 2013</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-citation"> <div class="field-label">Citation:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Yasseri, T., Hale, S.A., and Margetts, H. Modeling the Rise in Internet-based Petitions. Under review. <a href="http://arxiv.org/abs/1308.0239" title="http://arxiv.org/abs/1308.0239">http://arxiv.org/abs/1308.0239</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Collective action taking place on Internet platforms leaves a digital imprint which may be harvested to better understand the dynamics of mobilization. This ‘big data’ offers social science researchers the potential for new forms of analysis, using real-time transactional data based on entire populations, rather than sample-based surveys of what people think they did or might do. This paper uses a big data approach to track the growth of about 20,000 petitions to the UK Government over two years, analyzing the rate of growth and the outreach mechanism. The number of signatures was collected for all petitions with an hourly resolution. The vast majority of petitions did not achieve any measure of success; over 99 percent failed to get the 10,000 signatures required for an official response, and only 0.1 percent attained the 100,000 required for a parliamentary debate. We analyze the data through a multiplicative process model framework to explain the growth of signatures. We have defined and measured an average outreach factor for petitions and show that it decays very fast (reducing to 0.1% after 10 hours); after 24 hours, a petition’s fate is virtually set. </p> <p><strong>Keywords</strong>: petitions, collective action, e-democracy, big data, popularity dynamics</p> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/83#comments Big Data Citizen-Government Interactions Collective Action ippps Thu, 01 Aug 2013 14:02:25 +0000 Scott A. Hale 83 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Petition Growth and Success Rates on the UK No. 10 Downing Street Website http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/82 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-type"> <div class="field-label">Type:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Article </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication-cat"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Big Data </div> <div class="field-item even"> Collective Action </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-publication-date"> <div class="field-label">Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">May 2013</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-citation"> <div class="field-label">Citation:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Scott A. Hale, Helen Margetts, and Taha Yasseri. 2013. Petition growth and success rates on the UK No. 10 Downing Street website. In Proceedings of the 5th Annual ACM Web Science Conference (WebSci '13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 132-138.<br /> [<a href="http://arxiv.org/abs/1304.0588">Pre-print</a>] [<a href="http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2464464.2464518">Published Version</a>]</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Now that so much of collective action takes place online, web-generated data can further understanding of the mechanics of Internet-based mobilisation. This trace data offers social science researchers the potential for new forms of analysis, using real-time transactional data based on entire populations, rather than sample-based surveys of what people think they did or might do. This paper uses a `big data' approach to track the growth of over 8,000 petitions to the UK Government on the No. 10 Downing Street website for two years, analysing the rate of growth per day and testing the hypothesis that the distribution of daily change will be leptokurtic (rather than normal) as previous research on agenda setting would suggest. This hypothesis is confirmed, suggesting that Internet-based mobilisation is characterized by tipping points (or punctuated equilibria) and explaining some of the volatility in online collective action. We find also that most successful petitions grow quickly and that the number of signatures a petition receives on its first day is a significant factor in explaining the overall number of signatures a petition receives during its lifetime. These findings have implications for the strategies of those initiating petitions and the design of web sites with the aim of maximising citizen engagement with policy issues.</p> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/82#comments Big Data Citizen-Government Interactions Collective Action ippps Thu, 01 Aug 2013 13:57:39 +0000 Scott A. Hale 82 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Interactive Map of Central Government Online http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=blog/2012/10/interactive-map-central-government-online <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-blog-tags"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Big Data </div> <div class="field-item even"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> </div> </div> <div class="all-attached-images"><div class="image-attach-body image-attach-node-78" style="width: 100px;"><a href="/?q=content/ukgov2-620png"><img src="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/images/ukgov2-620.thumbnail.png" alt="ukgov2-620.png" title="ukgov2-620.png" class="image image-thumbnail " width="100" height="64" /></a></div> </div><p>We have collected and visualized a pilot crawl of UK Central Government websites in late 2011, showing all hyperlinks between central departments and the size of departmental web sites. This work was funded by the <a href="/projects/70">ESRC Internet, Public Policy and Political Science project</a> and the JISC-funded <a href="http://blogs.oii.ox.ac.uk/vis/">InteractiveVis project</a>. The UK government digital landscape is set for some major changes with the replacement of the direct.gov portal with the new gov.uk portal --- it will be interesting to see the difference in network configuration when we carry out the crawl again later this year.</p> <!--break--><!--break--><p>Please click the image below for an <a href="http://oxfordinternetinstitute.github.com/InteractiveVis/network/?config=config_ukgov.json">interactive HTML5 exploration of the crawl data</a>. (Please note, this requires an up-to-date browser: Firefox, Chrome, Opera, IE9+.)</p> <p><a href="http://oxfordinternetinstitute.github.com/InteractiveVis/network/?config=config_ukgov.json"><img src="/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/images/ukgov2-620.png" /></a></p> <style> .all-attached-images {display: none;} </style> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=blog/2012/10/interactive-map-central-government-online#comments Big Data Citizen-Government Interactions Digital Era Governance frontpage ippps Tue, 23 Oct 2012 08:15:20 +0000 Scott A. Hale 79 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Draft Paper: Understanding the Mechanics of Online Collective Action Using 'Big Data' http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/76 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-type"> <div class="field-label">Type:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Paper </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication-cat"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Collective Action </div> <div class="field-item even"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Big Data </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-publication-date"> <div class="field-label">Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Mar 2012</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-citation"> <div class="field-label">Citation:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Hale, Scott A and Margetts, Helen, Understanding the Mechanics of Online Collective Action Using 'Big Data' (March 22, 2012). Available at SSRN: <a href="http://ssrn.com/abstract=2041856" title="http://ssrn.com/abstract=2041856">http://ssrn.com/abstract=2041856</a> or <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2041856" title="http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2041856">http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2041856</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Now that so much of collective action takes place online, web-generated data can further understanding of the mechanics of Internet-based mobilization. This 'big data' offers social science researchers the potential for new forms of analysis, using real-time transactional data based on entire populations, rather than sample-based surveys of what people think they did or might do. This paper uses a 'big data' approach to track the growth of over 8,000 petitions to the UK Government on the No. 10 Downing Street website for two years, analyzing the rate of growth per day and testing the hypothesis that the distribution of daily change will be leptokurtic (rather than normal) as previous research on agenda setting would suggest. This hypothesis is confirmed, suggesting that Internet-based mobilization is characterized by tipping points (or punctuated equilibria) and explaining some of the volatility in online collective action. We find also that most successful petitions grow quickly and that the number of signatures a petition receives on its first day is the most significant factor explaining the overall number of signatures a petition receives during its lifetime. These findings could have implications for the strategies of those initiating petitions and the design of web sites with the aim of maximizing citizen engagement with policy issues. </p> <p>The full draft paper is available on SSRN. We welcome feedback on it.<br /> <a href="http://ssrn.com/abstract=2041856 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2041856">http://ssrn.com/abstract=2041856 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2041856</a></p> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/76#comments Big Data Citizen-Government Interactions Collective Action frontpage ippps Sun, 29 Apr 2012 16:45:35 +0000 Scott A. Hale 76 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org